Quick Links

Quick Links

  

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

 

Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly - they'll go through anything. You read and you're pierced.
--Aldous HuxleyBrave New World

Contact

Head of English: Ms C. Parkinson - parkinsonc@harpergreen.net 

Subject overview

 

In the English department, we believe in the power of words.  We want our students to leave Harper Green School with an excellent control of the English language, whether they are speaking, listening, reading or writing.  We teach both English Language and English Literature through set texts, and all students are given access to a broad range of writers, including canonical novelists, poets and playwrights. Throughout both Key Stage 3 and 4, students will build upon the skills developed in primary school.

Speaking and Listening

Students are encouraged to make plenty of contributions in lessons, to listen carefully to the ideas of others, and to critically reflect upon contributions. We explicitly teach learners the appropriate ways to talk and listen in different contexts.

Reading  

Students are encouraged to read regularly at home, and to learn to enjoy a wide range of fiction and non-fiction books. We actively teach reading strategies, and for students with reading ages that are below their chronological age, we tailor in-class support to ensure that everyone is able to access rich and challenging material.

Writing 

Learners will become increasingly competent in using language for deliberate effect to interest a reader. They learn to critically evaluate, proof-read, and redraft their work, reflecting on others’ suggestions. They will develop their own clear style as a writer, which we will teach them to employ across a range of contexts.

Key Stage 3 Overview

  We follow the National Curriculum for English at Key Stage 3. 

We read whole texts (rather than extracts), because we firmly believe that it is important for students to experience and enjoy books in their entirety. In our schemes of work, we include high quality novels, short stories, poems and plays with a wide coverage of genres, historical periods, forms and authors.

 

   

Year 7

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

About this unit

(Literary Heritage)

 

 

Oliver Twist by

Charles Dickens

 

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

Poetry Anthology: William Blake, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Langston Hughes, Richard Kell, Karl Sandburg and others.

 

 

Ancient Tales

Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Life in Victorian London; Victorian Crime; the form of the novel; Bill Sykes, Fagin, The Artful Dodger, Oliver; morality

Life in Elizabethan England; life in ancient Athens; Shakespeare’s life; the four lovers; the love potion; Elizabethan family relationships; the form of a play 

Poetic structure; use of metaphor; poetic forms

What Ancient Tales are; the oral story tradition; what the morals of stories are; ‘The Cheetah’s Whisker’; ‘Hansel and Gretel’; ‘Two Dinners’; ‘The Giant’s Causeway’; ‘The Wicked King’; ‘1001 Nights’

Analytical Writing

Topic sentences: Expressing a clear idea in response to the text using simple / compound sentences and pre-planned Tier 2 vocabulary.

+ Selecting and embedding a quotation effectively; choosing relevant quotations independently; + exploring effects of dramatic conventions.

 

+ exploring how writer’s choice of poetic language creates meaning, including using terminology accurately (*not feature spotting)

+ exploring how writer’s structural choices create meaning.  

Mastery Writing

Mastery Writing 1 and 2

Grammar content includes: writing in complete and full sentences; identifying the action and verb; subject-verb agreement for ‘to-be’, regular and irregular past simple verbs, avoiding fragments; avoiding fused sentences; using capital sentences accurately; using pronouns; sentence structure; paragraphing; speech punctuation.

 

Writing content includes: telling what happened; opening a story, writing about up to four images, writing with no images, structuring a story.

Assessment

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

 

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

 

Key vocabulary

Villain, victim, vulnerable, corrupt, naïve, orphan, moral

soliloquy, severe, conflict, unrequited love, to mock, chaos

Metaphor, literal language, metaphorical language, tenor, vehicle, ground

Quest, enunciation, ingenuity, out-wit, relatable, comeuppance, repentant

 

 

    

Year 8

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

About this unit

 

 

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

 

The Tempest by William Shakespeare

 

Animal Farm by George Orwell

 

Descriptive Writing and Poetry

Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Scientific developments in the Victorian era; class and society in Victorian England; the detective genre; duality; periodicals

The Elizabethan age of exploration; colonialism; nature / nurture; the form of a comedy; subplots; soliloquy and monologue; Italian city-states

Allegory; Orwell’s life and times; the Russian Revolution; recurring imagery; irony and corruption

Making a description emotive, using imagery, sequencing a piece of descriptive writing,

Poetry: Emily Dickinson, Ted Hughes, Grace Nichols, Seamus Heaney

Analytical Writing

Topic sentences: using complex sentences to express complex ideas or express more than one idea in topic sentences + linking ideas from one paragraph to another (topic sentences/janus sentences)  + embedding quotations + using tier 2 vocabulary to show knowledge of text & context + using terminology accurately (*not feature spotting).

+ Selecting and embedding multiple, linked quotations effectively; using dramatic terminology accurately to explore meaning of writer’s choices of dramatic conventions. + Memorising key knowledge and quotations for a closed book assessment  + character change / development . 

+ exploring how writer’s choice of literary form and structure, as well as language, creates meaning; + linking close textual analysis to contextual analysis (context of production) – how to write about historical context effectively

+ comparison of poetry and prose narrative

Mastery Writing

Mastery Writing 3

Grammar content includes: clauses; subordinate clauses; sentence demarcation; speech; apostrophes; possessive pronouns.

Writing content includes: problem solved stories; love stories; action stories; fantasy quests; horror stories; poetic justice, Chekov’s gun; avoiding deus ex-machina.

Assessment

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

+ exam

 

Learning checkpoints: fortnightly quizzes

Key vocabulary

to enlighten, deduction, scandal, periodical, introspective, dual nature, observation

colonialism, to usurp, tempest, treason, callous, pathos, nurture, tragicomedy

allegory, tyrant, rebellion, harvest, propaganda, cult of personality, treacherous; authorial intent

Extended metaphor, personification, sacrifice, narrative poem, allegory, characteristics, characterisation.

 

  

 

    

Year 9

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

About this unit

 

 

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

 

Othello by William Shakespeare

 

 

Unseen Poetry

 

Non-Fiction Reading and Writing.

Knowledge

 

 

 

 

 

The form of the gothic novel; the human condition; the Victorian double and duality; the class system; vanity explored through the story of Narcissus

 

 

Hierarchy, social and political structures, the form of a tragedy, Machiavelli, villainy, Aristotle’s triad of rhetoric.

The form of a poem; poetic structures; metaphor in poetry; poetic techniques.

Persuasive techniques

Manipulating the structure of a piece of non-fiction writing.

Features of a speech.

Rhetoric.

Analytical Writing

Topic sentences: using complex sentences to express complex ideas or express more than one idea in topic sentences + linking ideas from one paragraph to another + writing an introduction.

+ How to analyse structure through a whole text + character change

Comparative topic sentences for poetry comparison.

 

Writing Skills

Using vocabulary precisely to describe a setting.

Using persuasive techniques in non-fiction writing.

 

Adopting a persona.

Structuring an opening paragraph.

Structuring a closing paragraph.

Structuring an explanatory paragraph.

Assessment

 

Learning checkpoint x 2

 

 

Learning checkpoint x2

Learning checkpoint: June exam

Spoken language presentation.

Key vocabulary

Gothic, supernatural, allusion, doppelganger; duality; hypocrisy.

Hubris, antagonist, soliloquy, rhetoric, duplicity.

Resonates, emblematic, pensive, despondent, wistful, nostalgic.

 

 

Key Stage 4 Overview

We follow the AQA specifications for both English Language and English Literature. All students are entered for both GCSEs at the end of Year 11. 

Years 10 and 11 are spent developing skills in:

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Speaking
  • Listening

English Language

Students will be assessed through two papers, each assessing reading and writing in an integrated way. GCSE English Language will have an endorsed component, covering Spoken Language. This endorsement will be reported as a separate grade (PASS, MERIT, DISTINCTION, or not classified) and will not contribute to the result of the GCSE English Language qualification.

English Literature

Students will be assessed through two papers, each assessing understanding and analysis of a wide range of different texts and literary forms (novel, play and poetry).  Students will be expected to make links between the text and its context and there will be marks awarded, on each paper, for technical accuracy.

We study the set texts for Literature throughout both years, and place heavy emphasis on students revisiting and revising previously-learned content throughout the duration of the two year GCSE course.

 

 

 

    

Year 10

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

About this unit

 

An Inspector Calls by J. B Priestley

Jekyll and Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Narrative and Descriptive writing- Paper 1 Section B

Unseen poetry

Non-Fiction Writing- Paper 2, Section B

Spoken Language / Literature Revision and Mastery.

Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Dramatic devices 

Socialism and capitalism  

Priestley’s life and times.  

1912 vs 1945  

The presentation of key characters.  

The structure of a play.  

Priestley’s ‘big ideas’  

Life in Vıctorian England

The gothic tradition

Mental illness

Science and experimentation

Duality

Repression

Reputation

Secrecy and silence

The structure of a novel 

Non-linear structures.  

Cyclical structure.  

Withholding information.  

Characterisation.  

Settings.  

 

Poetic forms, structures and language devices.

Adopting a persona 

Hooking a reader with an engaging opening 

Cyclical structure 

Writing with a particular tone  

Students will also revisit crafting a sentence using rhetorical devices, using vocabulary appropriately, varying sentence types. 

Speaking confidently and audibly.

Listening to and building upon the contributions of others.

Organising information and ideas effectively.

Principles, generalisations AND concepts

Authors’ beliefs may be influenced by the context in which they were writing.

 

Priestley’s beliefs may have been influenced by his ideals surrounding socialism.  

Authors may be influenced by genre and context.

 

Stevenson may have been influenced by the gothic genre and Victorian values.  

The aim of this unit is to build upon students’ prior knowledge of descriptive and narrative writing by focusing on how to manipulate the structure a piece of writing for effect.

Authors may be influenced by their feelings.

The aim of this unit is to build upon students’ prior knowledge of writing to persuade by focusing on how to manipulate the structure a piece of writing for effect and in different forms.

The aim of this unit is to build upon students’ prior knowledge of writing to persuade by focusing on delivering a speech to a group of peers whilst demonstrating listening and responding skills.

Analytical Writing

Topic Sentences: purposeful crafting of topic sentences using vocabulary precisely + selecting relevant quotations in response to a specific question focus + understanding how to contextualise and embed quotations in an analytical paragraph.

Writing a conceptualised introduction: + selecting judicious quotations from an extract and the wider text to support topic sentences, in response to a specific question focus.

 

Selecting purposeful methods from an unseen text + developing detailed analysis of the relevant meanings.

 

Revision of analytical writing skills developed in Autumn and Spring terms.

 

Revision strategies

•       Mind maps- theme and character

•       Cue cards.

•       Review of critical theory/critical reading.

•       Essay planning

•       Timed exam responses.

 

Writing Skills

 

 

Use of descriptive techniques for effect.

Use of key tier 2 vocabulary.

Creating a story arc.

Creating a convincing character.

Manipulating structure for effect, including sentence structure and punctuation.

 

Use of persuasive techniques for effect.

Use of Tier 2 vocabulary.

How to adopt a persona in writing.

Manipulating structure and form for effect, including sentence structure and punctuation.

 

Application of non-fiction writing skills developed in Summer 1.

Assessment

Learning checkpoint x 2

 

Learning checkpoint x 1

+ Feb exam.

Learning checkpoint x 1

Feb exam

Learning checkpoint x 1

Learning checkpoint x 1

 

 

Key vocabulary

Socialism,  Capitalism,  Bourgeoisie,  Affluent,  Proletariat,  Egocentric,  Hubris,  Exploitation, Unrepentant, Petulant

Atavism, Darwinism, Depraved; Epistolary; Hubris, Inhuman; Juggernaut. Morality, oxymoron, Physiognomy, Repression, Reputation,  Troglodytic

Adorned, tormented, radiated, regarded, lacerating, descend, compelling, darted, enveloped, flickered, obliterated, contemplated.

Injustice,  Cherished,  Poignant,  Reconcile,  Impassioned,  Apprehension,  Bewilderment,  Unscrupulous,  Polarised,  Exasperation

Adorned,  Tormented,  Radiated,  Regarded,  Lacerating,  Descended,  Compelling,  Darted,  Enveloped,  Flickered

Revision of vocabuary covered in previous units.

 

 

 

 

    

Year 11

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer Term

About this unit

 

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

(7 weeks)

Reading and writing fiction texts: Paper 1

(7 weeks)

 

 

Non-fiction reading and writing- Paper 2

 

(6 weeks)

 

 

Power and Conflict Poetry / Mastery and Revision

 

(6 weeks)

 

 

Mastery and Revision

 

(7 weeks)

 

Lit Paper 1 Revision (Macbeth and Jekyll and Hyde)

 

 

Revision of English Language Paper 1 and Paper 2.

 

GCSE Examinations begin

 

Knowledge

 

 

 

 

Tragic conventions

The role of women in Jacobean society 

The beliefs of King James 1st

The concept of a hero

Witchcraft/the supernatural.  

Hubris 

Ambition  

Fate and free will.  

Good and evil.  

 

Language features.  

Structural features.  

The form of a novel.  

 

Language features.  

Persuasive/rhetorical devices.  

Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives.  

 

Prejudice  

Colonisation  

Immigration  

N.Ireland (60s-90s) 

Life in the trenches  

The French Revolution  

Gender inequality in mid 1800s  

Romanticism  

The Japanese Empire

Crimean war  

 

Revision strategies

•       Mind maps- theme and character

•       Cue cards.

•       Review of critical theory/critical reading.

•       Essay planning

•       Timed exam responses.

 

 

Principles, generalisations AND concepts

Authors may be influenced by both genre and context.

 

Shakespeare may have been influenced by the conventions of a tragic hero and the preferences and opinions of King James I.

The aim of this unit is to allow students to apply their analytical skills to an unseen extract. This unit draws upon their knowledge of structural analysis, language analysis and evaluation. It breaks down each threshold concept separately, rather than asking students to create one essay.

The aim of this unit is to allow students to apply their analytical skills to non-fiction texts. This unit draws upon their knowledge of comparison of viewpoints and language analysis. It breaks down each threshold concept separately, rather than asking students to create one essay.

Authors may be influenced by their experiences and the experiences of others. 

 

Poets may be influenced by their experiences and the experiences of others particularly surrounding identity, conflict and nature. 

 

 

Analytical Writing

Writing purposeful analytical paragraphs, driven by a relevant, conceptualised introduction + analysis which is driven by ideas and concepts.

Analysis of language + exploring quotations in a clear / detailed way.

Identifying explicit / implicit information in an unseen fiction text.

How to analyse structure throughout a whole text + character change.

Evaluating a writer’s choices in relation to a specific question focus.

Analysis of language + exploring quotations in a clear / detailed way.

Identifying explicit / implicit information in unseen non-fiction texts.

How to summarise information from two sources.

Identification and comparison of writers’ perspectives.

Writing comparative topic sentences. 

 

Comparative topic sentences driven by relevant thematic links between texts.

 

 

Writing Skills

 

Use of descriptive techniques for effect.

Use of key tier 2 vocabulary.

Creating a story arc.

Creating a convincing character.

Manipulating structure for effect, including sentence structure and punctuation.

Use of persuasive techniques for effect.

Use of Tier 2 vocabulary.

How to adopt a persona in writing.

Manipulating structure and form for effect, including sentence structure and punctuation.

 

 

 

 

Assessment

Learning checkpoint x 2

November exam

Learning checkpoint x 1

 

Learning checkpoint x 1

March exam

March exam

 

 

Key vocabulary

Prophesying,  Dichotomy,  Deceitful,  Manifest,  Manipulative,  Sacrilegious,  Corroborate,  Ambivalent,  Erratic,  Antagonise.

Tone, mood, cyclical structure, flashback, motif, tone, characterisation, figurative language

Rhetoric, tone, cyclical structure. Persona, perspective.

Transcend,  Existential,  Belie,  Subservient,  Menacing,  Egotistical,  Patriotism,  Fleeting